How Javascript Plays its Role in Big Tech Companies..🔻

Source: Google

If you can, imagine a time before the invention of the Internet. Websites didn’t exist, and books, printed on paper and tightly bound, were your primary source of information. Today you can open a web browser, jump over to your search engine of choice, and search away. Any bit of imaginable information rests at your fingertips.

To start any website, you need to create an HTML “skeleton”. HTML is the code that holds the content for the website, whereas CSS is the “styling” of each HTML element.

HTML

HyperText Markup Language, gives content structure and meaning by defining that content as, for example, headings, paragraphs, or images.

CSS

Cascading Style Sheets, is a presentation language created to style the appearance of content — using, for example, fonts or colors.

Javascript

JavaScript is a scripting or programming language that allows you to implement complex features on web pages, every time a web page does more than just sit there and display static information for you to look at , displaying timely content updates, interactive maps, animated 2D/3D graphics, scrolling video jukeboxes, etc. You can bet that JavaScript is probably involved. It is the third layer of the layer cake of standard web technologies, two of which (HTML and CSS)

source: google

Top Tech Companies using Javascript 👇

Google

How doesn’t Google use JavaScript? Seriously, it’s everywhere. Google’s search results that spring up as your typing get there with JavaScript. The Gmail web client is powered by JavaScript. Google Docs? Yeah, that’s JavaScript too.

Google develops and usually open sources it’s own JavaScript tools. The most obvious example is AngularJS. Angular is used most prominently in Google’s DoubleClick advertising platform, but it’s also one of the most popular front end frameworks available. It’s even part of the MEAN stack.

Google’s more intensive services, like Google Docs, use Closure Tools. This set of tools compiles JavaScript into a lower-level faster form more suited for rich and highly responsive web applications.

PayPal

PayPal has obviously been using JavaScript on the front end of their website for a long time, but that’s only the beginning.

The online payment giant was one of the earliest adopters of NodeJS. During an overhaul of their account overview page, they decided to try building the page in Node at the same time as their usual Java development. The NodeJS version worked out so well, that they chose to use it in production and build all client-facing applications in Node going forward. That means that most of what you see in your account is running on Node.

NetFlix

Like PayPal, Netflix started out using Java for just about everything. They too ran into problems with Java’s size and the time it required to develop.

Over time, Netflix moved away from its more traditional structure into the cloud and started to introduce NodeJS. With Node, Netflix was able to break down pieces of their user interface into individual services. This more distributed approach was able to speed things up an alleviate stress on their servers. Today, a large portion of Netflix’s interface is running on Node.

Uber

Uber needs to handle loads of data in real time. They have millions of requests coming in continuously, and that’s not just hits on a page. Uber needs to track driver locations, rider locations, and incoming ride requests. It has to seamlessly sort that data and match riders as fast as possible.

All of that plays to NodeJS’s and JavaScript’s strengths. Node is designed to handle requests and hand off data quickly. It’s asynchronous capabilities are a huge part of that. Node is central to Uber’s user facing stack for just that reason.

Linkedin

LinkedIn relies on NodeJS for its mobile site. A few years back, LinkedIn used Rails for its mobile site. As with other other large Rails applications, it was slow, monolithic, and it scaled poorly.
LinkedIn switched over to NodeJS to solve its scaling problems. Node’s asynchronous capabilities allowed the LinkedIn mobile site to perform more quickly than before while using fewer resources. Node also made data sharing and building APIs easier for the LinkedIn developers.

JavaScript Is Everywhere!

These are some of the Big Tech companies using Javascript and you can find much more. So much of the web runs on JavaScript, it’d be much harder to find a company that doesn’t use JavaScript in some way.
These companies are among the largest tech companies in the world. Many are also running the largest production deployments of NodeJS. The others are responsible for important parts of the JavaScript ecosystem as a whole.

Thanks for Reading..!

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